Font Police is patrolling the world for bad typography. We issue misdemeanours for spelling mistakes and lengthy sentences in our criticisms.

This is a light-hearted humour site, with no offence intended. Send ideas to submissions@ followed by fontpolice.org. (Please indicate if you would prefer to be anonymous.)
Golly G Found by lunandroid: try not to substitute characters in a word with pieces of fruit.

Golly G Found by lunandroid: try not to substitute characters in a word with pieces of fruit.

How to decipher conflicting signs Only the upper sign is valid. The lower one is in a version of Helvetica Bold that is artificially condensed by 20 per cent and, therefore, can be ignored.

How to decipher conflicting signs Only the upper sign is valid. The lower one is in a version of Helvetica Bold that is artificially condensed by 20 per cent and, therefore, can be ignored.

Locum Via Reddit, with top image courtesy Ingvar Hallström. Be very careful when replacing characters with symbols, especially with sans serif typefaces where I and l can be confused.

Kubricked If forging a document purporting to be from 1970, choose a typeface that wasn’t designed in 1986. Also, don’t use smart quotes: an everyday typewriter wouldn’t have them.

Kubricked If forging a document purporting to be from 1970, choose a typeface that wasn’t designed in 1986. Also, don’t use smart quotes: an everyday typewriter wouldn’t have them.

É up A sign in New Zealand. We don’t mind the mixture of typefaces too much, but make sure the leading doesn’t suffer. However, if you are getting things translated, check that the accents go round the right way for French. From Anthony Leung on Twitter.

É up A sign in New Zealand. We don’t mind the mixture of typefaces too much, but make sure the leading doesn’t suffer. However, if you are getting things translated, check that the accents go round the right way for French. From Anthony Leung on Twitter.

Not good for your visual health Toni Reid spotted the Family Health Freedom Network, and wisely informed the Font Police. The logo itself has a falsely condensed cut of Arial, and in the above example, the URL has been stretched. On the website itself, the name and the slogan have been condensed by different percentages. It seems to use all caps everywhere (and squashes them, too), especially with the old Balloon Extra Bold typeface, which older readers may remember from Letraset dry-transfer sheets. We also spotted Dom Casual there, also condensed. Someone is having too much fun playing with the original proportions to these types, and for the sake of legibility and taste, please stop.

Not good for your visual health Toni Reid spotted the Family Health Freedom Network, and wisely informed the Font Police. The logo itself has a falsely condensed cut of Arial, and in the above example, the URL has been stretched. On the website itself, the name and the slogan have been condensed by different percentages. It seems to use all caps everywhere (and squashes them, too), especially with the old Balloon Extra Bold typeface, which older readers may remember from Letraset dry-transfer sheets. We also spotted Dom Casual there, also condensed. Someone is having too much fun playing with the original proportions to these types, and for the sake of legibility and taste, please stop.

Highway patrolled These signs in Kyle, Texas have rightly prompted Kristine Smith to contact the Font Police. The very uneven weight of the first sign, and the backwards W on the second, are very concerning—and might prove distracting and dangerous to drivers. (And why are these set in Times New Roman anyway?)

Type emergency St John’s Hospital in Tulsa, Oklahoma wishes to tell us that being in the triage unit is funny, with its use of Monotype Plantin in a variety of jolly, different sizes and an alternative baseline for the g. We’re also not sure if the last two lines are meant to be centred, and someone seems to have had terrible trouble applying those characters upright, spaced and on the baselines. Submitted by Calen Coffman.

Type emergency St John’s Hospital in Tulsa, Oklahoma wishes to tell us that being in the triage unit is funny, with its use of Monotype Plantin in a variety of jolly, different sizes and an alternative baseline for the g. We’re also not sure if the last two lines are meant to be centred, and someone seems to have had terrible trouble applying those characters upright, spaced and on the baselines. Submitted by Calen Coffman.

Happiness We at the Font Police have never been happy about people artificially condensing their type. However, things go one worse here: each line has been condensed to a different degree. Add the poor centring, and we have two charges that should be slapped on here. (Via Twitter.)

Happiness We at the Font Police have never been happy about people artificially condensing their type. However, things go one worse here: each line has been condensed to a different degree. Add the poor centring, and we have two charges that should be slapped on here. (Via Twitter.)

(Source: superpunch2, via nevver)